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Benjamin Franklin bifocals

On this day in 1788, the U.S. Constitution is ratified, which currently makes it the most long-standing written constitution in the world.

The Constitution is the second of two of Our essential founding documents. The first is the Declaration of Independence. The Declaration explains the foundation of Our nation, and contains several direct references to God.

The Constitution explains how our nation is to function, and is firmly rooted in the Declaration, which explains the why. So, despite the apostate assertion that God, certainly not the God of the Bible, is not ‘in’ the Constitution, it is clear that He is indeed inherent and indispensable.

Roots of Religion

First, when the framers used the term “religion,” as in the First Amendment, they were referring to the Protestant denominations of Christianity. After all, it was the Anglican Church that was the state religion when the colonies were under British rule.

Additionally, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof….” is to prevent one of these denominations from becoming a state religion once again. It does not lend itself to pluralism or even neutrality in regards to faith, as some would pervert the meaning of the phrase “separation of church and state.” Besides, that phrase that does not appear in Our founding documents.

Also, Article I, Section 7 states: “If any Bill shall not be returned by the President within ten Days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the Same shall be a Law, in like Manner as if he had signed it.…” Sundays. Not Fridays (Islam). Not Saturdays (Judaism). Not any other day of the week. Sundays.

After all, the Constitution was Done in Convention by the Unanimous Consent of the States present the Seventeenth Day of September in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and Eighty seven..,”

In addition, the Year of our Lord, as in Anno Domini, as in A.D. Not C.E. (Common Era) and not A.H. (Anno Hegirae).

Franklin and the Father

Finally, regarding years, Benjamin Franklin was the elder statesman (81 years old) at the Constitutional Convention of 1787 in Philadelphia. There, he urged the Assembly toward daily prayer to seek guidance from “the Father of Lights.” In doing so, he said this:

“I have lived a long time, Sir, a long time, and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth—that God governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without his notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without his aid?”

His famous quote, paired with his sketch of bifocals in his personal correspondence, inspired our “Benjamin Franklin “See… God Governs” t-shirt design, as seen below. So, find yours HERE!

Benjamin Franklin bifocals

US Great Seal Reverse

On this day in 1782, Congress adopts the Great Seal of the United States. Adoption came six years after the Continental Congress appointed the original committee to design a seal. Congress appointed the original committee just a few hours after they adopted the Declaration of Independence, on July 4, 1776.

The Obverse

US Great Seal Obverse
E Pluribus Unum, Latin for Out of Many, One, was once a de facto motto of the United States. However, it was never codified into law. Thus, In God We Trust is the official national motto.
Our Lost Founding suggests that perhaps the two go hand in hand.

The Reverse

US Great Seal Reverse

Signals signified

Founding Father and Patriot Charles Thomson’s “Remarks and Explanation” are the only official comments about the symbolism and the meaning of the Great Seal. Here is the portion regarding The Reverse:

“The pyramid signifies Strength and Duration: The Eye over it & the Motto allude to the many signal interpositions of providence in favour of the American cause. The date underneath is that of the Declaration of Independence and the words under it signify the beginning of the new American Æra, which commences from that date.–” (emphasis added)

“The Motto” Annuit Cœptis translates to (Providence) favors our undertakings.

Lastly, Thomson, also a Greek scholar, spent his final years working on an English translation of the Bible.

Great Seal Thomson Report Page 2Great Seal Thomson Report Page 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Declaration Committee John Adams Thomas Jefferson Benjamin Franklin United States

On this day in 1776, this new nation is renamed the “United States” of America, replacing “United Colonies.”

We find the formal declaration in an excerpt from a Continental Congress Journal entry, written by John Adams:

“Monday September 9, 1776.
Resolved, that in all Continental Commissions, and other Instruments where heretofore the Words, ‘United Colonies,’ have been used, the Stile be altered for the future to the United States.”

The debate about who exactly coined the name “United States of America” is unsettled. Still, the designation first formally appears twice in the Declaration of Independence. As such, the National Archives credits the name to Thomas Jefferson, the primary draftsman of the document.

Indeed, John Adams was one of the five statesmen on that ‘Declaration Comittee,’ pictured below. Benjamin Franklin was also on that outstanding committee.

Regardless, the exact origin of the name is irrelevant in comparison the overall intent of our founders.

Pulling Down Strongholds

The Declaration of Independence states:

“We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States;”

Less than three months prior, Mr. Adams wrote this as part of letter to his cousin, Zabdiel:

“Statesmen my dear Sir, may plan and speculate for Liberty, but it is Religion and Morality alone, which can establish the Principles upon which Freedom can securely stand. . . . The only foundation of a free Constitution, is pure Virtue, and if this cannot be inspired into our People, in a greater Measure, than they have it now, They may change their Rulers, and the forms of Government, but they will not obtain a lasting Liberty.—They will only exchange Tyrants and Tyrannies.—You cannot therefore be more pleasantly, or usefully employed than in the Way of your Profession, pulling down the Strong Holds of Satan.”

 

John Adams

 

Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo

On this day in 1848, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo is signed, thus ending the costly and controversial Mexican-American War. Guadalupe Hidalgo, a city north of Mexico City, was where the Mexican government fled as the Americans advanced.

The Treaty also extended the boundaries of the United States to the Pacific Ocean. This westward expansion included the areas that would eventually become the states of Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah, along with parts of Colorado and Wyoming.

This nearly completed the continental expansion of the United States, called “Manifest Destiny,” at the time, and championed by President James K. Polk. Similarly, the politically contentious war spurred the political ascension of future presidents Zachary Taylor and Abraham Lincoln.

Author of Peace

The Treaty begins with these immensely powerful words: “In the name of Almighty God… .”

Here is the opening from the Spanish version: “En el nombre de Dios Todo-poderoso… ”

Finally, here’s a key excerpt of the Treaty:

“The… United States… and the… Mexican Republic… have, under the protection of Almighty God, the author of peace, arranged, agreed upon, and signed the following: Treaty of Peace, Friendship, Limits, and Settlement between the United States of America and the Mexican Republic.”

Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo