John F. Kennedy Moon shot JFK

On this day in 1958, Congress passes legislation establishing NASA, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

A few years later, on May 25, 1961, President John F. Kennedy delivers his Special Message to the Congress on Urgent National Needs. During “Section IX: Space,” he famously challenged:
“First, I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth. No single space project in this period will be more impressive to mankind, or more important for the long-range exploration of space; and none will be so difficult or expensive to accomplish.”

Later, on September 12, 1962 he reiterated that important challenge:
“We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too.”

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Finally, he concluded with stirring simplicity:
“Many years ago the great British explorer George Mallory, who was to die on Mount Everest, was asked why did he want to climb it. He said, “Because it is there.”

Well, space is there, and we’re going to climb it, and the moon and the planets are there, and new hopes for knowledge and peace are there. And, therefore, as we set sail we ask God’s blessing on the most hazardous and dangerous and greatest adventure on which man has ever embarked.”

John F. Kennedy Moon shot JFK

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