John F. Kennedy Acceptance Speech Democratic National Convention 1960

Nominated

On this day in 1960, Senator John F. Kennedy is nominated for the presidency by the Democratic Convention, defeating Senator Lyndon B. Johnson, who is named his running mate the next day.

Upon accepting the nomination, JFK closed his address with these words:

“Give me your help, your hand, your voice, your vote. Recall with me the words of Isaiah: “They that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run and not be weary.”

As we face the coming challenge, we too, shall wait upon the Lord, and ask that he renew our strength. Then shall we be equal to the test. Then we shall not be weary. And then we shall prevail.”

Kennedy went on to win one of the closest presidential elections in U.S. history, narrowly besting Vice President Richard M. Nixon, becoming the youngest candidate ever elected to the presidency and also the first Catholic president. 

Inaugurated

JFK opened his famous inaugural address with these words:

“We observe today not a victory of party but a celebration of freedom–symbolizing an end as well as a beginning–signifying renewal as well as change. For I have sworn before you and Almighty God the same solemn oath our forbears prescribed nearly a century and three-quarters ago.

The world is very different now. For man holds in his mortal hands the power to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life. And yet the same revolutionary beliefs for which our forebears fought are still at issue around the globe–the belief that the rights of man come not from the generosity of the state but from the hand of God.”

He closed with these:

“The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it–and the glow from that fire can truly light the world.

And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you–ask what you can do for your country.

My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.

Finally, whether you are citizens of America or citizens of the world, ask of us here the same high standards of strength and sacrifice which we ask of you. With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on earth God’s work must truly be our own.

After less than three years in office, Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas.

John F. Kennedy Acceptance Speech Democratic National Convention 1960

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